John Sharrock Taylor

John Sharrock Taylor

Writer, Genealogist & Patient Choir Basher

FINDING ROGER THE LODGER


DNA solves the hundred-year-old mystery of a missing grandfather

Whenever Sally Lund  (above with her daughters Eileen and Joyce) came home from a pilgrimage she would bring back a holy medal to add to her tinkling collection. As her son Charlie (left) put it ‘My mother’s got more bloody gongs than Goering and the same size chest to pin ‘em on.’

 

Sally also brought back watches as presents for the family, though these didn’t tinkle because she pinned them inside her corsets to fool the Customs men. ‘I know it’s a sin,’ she said, ‘but I’ll go to confession in the morning.’


Sally had not always been a Catholic. She started life as a Primitive Methodist in Platt Bridge near Wigan, which is where her story, and Tom's, begins.





Methodist Procession 
Platt Bridge 1900

Sally was the founder of the well-known Wigan retail firm of SA Lund and Son. The Son was my wife Val’s dad Tom. He and his widowed mother had built up the business from scratch, starting with a barrow on Wigan market and ending up with three profitable outlets in the town centre. According to my mother Beatrice (left) Lunds could supply anything you needed, from a tin tray to a trousseau, all of the best quality and at the best price. Sally was a born saleswoman. When a lady admired the dress she was wearing in the shop she stripped off then and there and sold it to the astonished customer.










Tom and Ethel fell in love on the Wigan tram on their way to school. She was not Catholic, which didn't please Sally.






Tom and Ethel about to board a flight to the Isle of Man in the late 1930s

THE LONDON GAZETTE, 18 JULY, 1939

 

NOTICE is hereby given that Thomas William Williams of 55, Gathurst Road,, Orrell, near Wigan in the county of Lancaster, Draper, abandoned the surname of Williams and adopted the surname of LUND by a deed dated the 7th day of June 1939 and enrolled in the Supreme Court of Judicature on the 12th day of June 1939.—Dated this 13th day of July 1939.

 

CAMPBELL PASQUILL and BUJLLOUGH

Prudential Buildings, Library Street, Wigan

Solicitors for the said Thomas William Lund.
















Bubbles
Val practising to be a Pears baby.













Val and Margaret with their grandfather Will Fairhurst JP and the Mayor of Wigan




Val in Convent uniform.
Butter wouldn't melt.





Tom, Val and Margaret went riding together. Margaret says 'Dad fell off at least once and I sometimes went over the jumps without the bloody horse, but with valiant Val the horse always knew who was boss.'

Tom was the driving force at SA Lund and when he died suddenly in 1970 at the age of only fifty-five the life seemed to ebb out of the business. Years later, sorting through a box of documents, I came across the will of Sally’s husband Arthur Lund. It said:

 

‘I leave the remainder of my property in equal shares to my children, including my adopted son Thomas’.

 

This was news to Val and her sister Margaret who had naturally thought Arthur had been their grandfather. Tom’s birth certificate showed that he had been registered as Thomas William Williams, born in Platt Bridge on the 23rd  May 1915 to nineteen-year-old Sarah Ann Williams. The space for the father’s name was blank so we called him Roger the Lodger.













Tom and Ethel at our wedding, August 1968

Tom’s birth entry showed that he had not been born in the Williams home but at the house of a neighbouring family. I looked them up in the Census.


              'Does the name Dale ring any bells?’ I asked Val.


            ‘Yes, when Margaret and I were children we were told we were special because we had three grannies. Granny Dale wasn’t related to us by blood but Dad thought the world of her.’


          ‘The Dales had a daughter, Florence, who was four years older than Sally. I think she may have been your Granny Dale.’

Sally, pregnant at eighteen and thrown out by her irate father, had been rescued by twenty-three-year-old Florence Dale who had been a true friend. Then it occurred to me that she might have been something more. Could her brother Robert have been Tom’s missing father?


I spent weeks constructing an experimental family tree on Ancestry UK with Robert in the role of Roger the Lodger. I hoped it would show connections with other Dale trees on Ancestry. It didn’t but I was reluctant to abandon my theory.

Val and I had our DNA tested by Ancestry and it came up with some surprises, not least that Granny Sally had been my distant cousin, which made Val my cousin too. But Val’s strongest DNA match by far was with Andrew Davenport. The Williams, the Dales and the Davenports had been close neighbours and members of the same Methodist church. More than that, Robert Dale's daughter had married Andrew Davenport's uncle. Surely this had to be the link! After months more searching I had to concede that it wasn't. Whoever Roger the Lodger was, he hadn’t been a Dale.

Another idea occurred to me. My maternal grandparents Beatrice and Sydney Hart, had married in 1918 as soon as Sydney could obtain leave from the army. Beatrice was already five months pregnant and my mother, another Beatrice, put in her appearance scarcely four months later. Perhaps Roger, too, had been a Great War soldier but, like so many others, had not returned.

 

Andrew Davenport's great grandmother Ann, widowed in a mining accident, had lost two sons in the First World War. The younger one, another Andrew, a year older than Sally, had fought in the Royal Naval Division and been killed in a night raid on a German trench at Arras on 19th March 1918.


I had found Roger the Lodger.

Young Andrew had enlisted in September 1915, four months after Tom’s birth, so I had to discount any romantic notion that he had been longing rush home from France and make an honest woman of Sally. Had he done so he would have been too late, for she had already married Arthur Lund, a good man eleven years her senior, who had not hesitated to raise another man’s child.
















War Memorial Platt Bridge
Val was a War baby, born when Tom was a Sergeant Major in the Royal Artillery.
We were married at Richmond Hill  Church, where Val's grandfather Will Fairhurst had been a founding Elder.

We rejected Wagner and Mendelssohn but Granny Sally gave us a bell that played 'Here comes the bride'.
Sally's husband Arthur Lund traded in domestic furnishings in Caroline Street, Wigan. When he died in 1931 he left over £12,000 in his will, the equivalent of £835.000 in today's money. The family attended St Joseph's church where Tom received his First Communion from Fr Van Wassenhove on 22nd March 1922.
The Vine Inn on the corner of Caroline and Chapel Streets
Lunds' carpet warehouse in the Wiend, Wigan, now a restaurant